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elektronik.hfbk.net

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Courses

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  • Aleatoric Lab I: Code, Language & Chance

    full

    Room:

    213a/b LE

    Dates:

    Tue 10.11.2020/17.11.2020/24.11.2020 each 14.00 – 19.00 (FULL)
    (all three dates are mandatory)

    The practise of aleatory (from latin aleatorius "belonging to the player", alea "dice, risk, chance") as it exists in music, art and literature is understood as the deliberate use of non-systematic operations with a unpredictable, often random result.

    Goal of the course is to enable students to use their own computers as a tool for the production of aleatoric text and language. The learned skills can not only be used for text, but can also be applied to the creation of acoustic or visual objects. To achieve this we will use the programming language Python to read texts from files or the web in an automated fashion (webscraping) and use these texts as the base for further processes.

    Programming is an abstract topic and three days are not much to learn it. To utilize the time it students are recommended to look at the basics of the language beforehand on their own terms (there is a ton of tutorial texts and videos online). Questions will be answered via mail.

    Required for participation is a laptop (operating system doesn't matter, as long as it runs Python).

    Interactive 3D with Unity

    full

    Room:

    Aula LE

    Dates:

    Two blocks on the weekends of 20. – 22.11.2020 and 04. – 06.12.2020, each 11.00 – 16.00

    Game Engines like Unity enable the creation of interactive realtime artworks which can react on the inputs of viewers, participants or other data streams. The results can be made visible through screens, projectors and VR-glasses; and audible through speakers and headphones. In this course the creative potentials of this technology should be investigated. On two weekends the basics of the Unity-Editor and the scripting language C3 shall be learned. We will have a look at the import of 3D-objects from different sources (Blender, 3D-Scan, Downloads, ...), a look at VR-glasses, interfacing with external hardware, export and presentation.

    Goal of the course is primarily to explore the possibilities of game engines beyond their traditional use, to increase the security when dealing with complex technological problems and to create a basis for self guided learning and working. No prior knowledge is assumed – however only rudimentary skills in 3D-modelling will be thought, which is why it is recommended (but not required) to take part in the introductory course for Blender. Students can install the Unity Editor on their own devices (Linux, Mac OS, Windows) for free: store.unity.com/download

    Required for participation is a laptop and a 3-button-mouse.

    Short Introduction on Audio and Video Formats

    full

    Room:

    K51

    Dates:

    Students can apply for one Block:
    Block 1: Fr 27.11.2020, 14.00 – 18.00 (FULL)
    Block 2: Mo 30.11.2020, 14.00 – 18.00 (FULL)

    Close contact with obscure video- and audio settings is not a new thing for most artists, filmers and designers. But which CODEC from a list of seemingly a hundred is the right one? Which does look better? Where are the downsides? How about archival? Which software can I use? Choosing the wrong settings can destroy weeks of preparation, make post production harder and leave a visible imprint on the end result. In this course we will discuss how to avoid typical mistakes and issues. For this we will have a look at the basics, and exchange tips and tricks for the practical work with video and audio files.

    Recommended watch: Cinema Futures [2016], 126" documentary film by Michael Palm

    Technology is not Magic – Part I: Circuit Bending

    full

    Room:

    K51 LE

    Dates:

    Students can apply for one of the following blocks:
    Block 1: 18. – 19.01.2021, 12.00 – 18.00 (FULL)
    Block 2: 25. – 26.01.2021, 12.00 – 18.00 (FULL)
    Block 3: 01. – 02.02.2021, 12.00 – 18.0 (FULL)

    »Circuit bending is the creative, chance-based customization of the circuits within electronic devices such as low-voltage, battery-powered guitar effects, children’s toys and digital synthesizers to create new musical or visual instruments and sound generators.«

    Beyond traditional ways of learning electronics this course teaches basic ideas and intuitions for dealing with sound by modifying existing circuits. Participants of this course have to bring their own low voltage devices. Especially suitable are typically battery powered music toys (toy pianos, toy drums etc) that can be found cheaply on flea markets or on the internet.